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THE PROBLEM OF THE GROWTHS OF CIVILIZATIONS The Armted Civi Hxations TN giving this chapter its are we not begging a question? v-v* r n, i^^x Mt A STUDY OF HISTORY TSt ftiyaf Inslxtu U ^ Jnter HClioftat Affairs u an ttitcfficud aitd nan-pot Uical fcerfy./w*^ w zpia to tntotrage a7\d /aei Jitate Ota se Unti Ju tlu^ ^ i Jitematurml ^uatiam. The Nuincrtcal Ratio between Subjeca end Mwron in the Otnrai A Empire and ia Laconia C i ( 9 ) AHf^t Some Mahc'Wuffhta agacnet Social Retardation * *e Geographiesu Expmioo of (he Waiem World n (h) Ajvux 2: The Concept of the Second Coning in ita Psycho loglal Setting ..... Amt* TV: The Victory of the City 395 455 4SS 46 a 466 473 477 INDEX TO VOLUMES I-III.49* Ill THE GROWTHS OF CIVILIZATIONS A.If we take a survey of civilizations that have duly come to birth— in contrast to those embryonic civilizations that have miscarried— do we find, as a matter of fact, that they have invariably grown thereafter in wisdom and in stature? above.) 4 THE PROBLEM OF THE GROWTHS OP CIYILIZATIONS towards solvi J3g :t will be to collect as many specimens of arrested civilizatioos a$ we can. For s time they had lingered on the ice to hunt more seals; then, turning landward, they bad pursued the caribou over the snow-covered hilb and plains.Frequently—perbaps usually —they have gone on growing, no doubt. societies are cases in point For although, in our day, all but seven of the twenty-one are extinct, and although the majority of these seven are now unmistakably in decay, it is evident, on the other hand, that even the shortest-lived and least successful of these twenty-one societies did achieve at least some measure of growth after It had come to birth, But the twenty-one developed civilizations' and the four abortive civilizations’ are not the only examples of civilizations that an empirical survey reveals to us. We can readily lay hands on half a dozen specimens of the kind. Now the snow was vsnlshlng, the caribou had scattered, and fisn alone pro¬ vided a sure livelihood until rnidaummer, So myparty, Iike many another throughout the country, was dividing into its constituent households, each of which now toiled for itself alone. D.: 7%€ Aeopis ef Ue Tailighi (New Yofk ipjj, Mscmil Ua Compeneh t?

The Polynesians, for instance, ventured xipon the tour deforce of Oceanic voyaging. *lt ought be asked whether the pre'&kimo advance towards the north, to the l^dxa and the Archipelago, took place voluntarily or was due to pressure from southern nel^bours. But it is a question whether this inferior social dliferentiatioo is due to primidveness, or whether it ia not rather a result of the natural conditions under which the Eskimo have lived from time urunemorlal. They must know, by sure intui¬ tion, when to be benevolent and when to be severe; when to be prudent and when to be prompt in action. (be Greek THE PROBLEM OF THE GROWTHS OF CIVILIZATIONS is has accomplisbed it to atone fot its audacity by paying a penalty of equivalent magnitude.This is s question which has to be answered If our title is to stand. Food had heat common to all, and their snow-houses had adjoined each other so closely that the families seemed absorbed In the group.Let ua turn, for an answer, to the empirical method of inquiry which has often stood us in good stead. With the return¬ ing sun and lengthening days, Nature had recalled its lifethe seals had appeared on top of the ice, the caribou had come nortbw W again, and the tribes of Euimos bad broken up into little bands.They grapple with the jutting crag, only to find them- I Inconcrm te«mi, ib^are rtsp MMS ehi Uraget ofi A in(er Tn«ditbe dur« «f MTmrr b*Twe « a t U ch$ll«n B« siimuli M The Achieajis to attu the He Und (h« eheltenau vrhkh were jui( loo tefott to ellow the Ihsb end the t^er Moiefk to hnne ibe Abortive Fu Weacera Chf Utieo esd (be Abortive Scudaoenm Crriliueo Q to birib. Their motto—and eventual epitaph—is 'J'y auis, j’y reste’. If a shepherd or herdsman who had grown up in a sedentary society were suddenly put in charge of the Nomad’s flocks and herds in the Nomad's environment, he would find himself almost as helpless as a vine-dresser or a ploughman; for the shepherd of the Steppes has no meadows to yield him hay for winter fodder, and no brother-husbandman to provide him with cattle-food by arti¬ ficial cultivation, and no brother-industrialist to transform an un¬ wieldy truss of soya-beans into handily portable oil-cake.'fhey are performing an Mtonishing acrobatic feat, but a feat in the realm of Statics and not in the realm of Dynamics. Winter 1 In the besiftrnng 1 of wi Atet, the 1 coa#t lend 1 later ' 1 in the wtntsi.. In season and out of season, the Nomad must find subsistence for his cattle from the natural vegetation of the barren and parsimonious Steppe; and he can only imd it by adapting his life and his movements meticulously to the vagaries of a severe and unfriendly physical environment.

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